Rugged and vast, Canada has much to explore and enjoy. Driving gives you freedom to travel at your own pace, allowing you to pull over and appreciate scenery along the way or break the journey to participate in activities such as hiking and kayaking.

Whether you’re into mountains, beaches or urban heritage, a road trip is a great way of experiencing the enormity and diversity of Canada’s landscape. Here are five of our favourite routes.

1. The Cabot Trail, Nova Scotia

The Cabot Trail loops 298km around the north of Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia. The route winds along the coast for much of its length, making it a joy to spend time behind the wheel. Viewpoints overlook the North Atlantic and plunging cliffs.

Locals say the region’s fall colours mean the trail is prettiest during autumn but the dramatic landscapes of Cape Breton Highlands National Park look good throughout the year. Moose roam the park, where walking trails give you opportunities to stretch your legs and breathe sea air.

Islanders are proud of their French-influenced Acadian heritage and Celtic ancestry, celebrating it via live music in pubs. Experience it in Chéticamp, a fishing village where you can tuck into locally landed lobster and seasonal seafood.

Park up in Pleasant Bay and join a cruise to view whales and seals, and don’t miss the chance to kick off your shoes on the sand close to Ingonish.

Best for: dramatic coastal scenery.
How long: 5 days

نتيجة بحث الصور عن ‪The Cabot Trail, Nova Scotia‬‏

2. The Icefields Parkway, Alberta

You can motor along the 232km route of the Icefields Parkway in just four hours, but that wouldn’t do justice to the magnificence of the woodland wilderness, waterfalls and jagged mountains either side of the highway.

This route runs between Banff and Jasper, cutting through the Rocky Mountains and skirting through two national treasures, Banff National Park and Jasper National Park. They are the home to the vast Columbia Icefield. Learn about the region’s geology during guided hikes on the Athabasca and Saskatchewan glaciers.

Overnighting at one of Jasper National Park’s campsites means being able to stare at constellations in one of the world’s biggest dark sky reserves. Camping is also a way of feeling the enormity of the scenery and maximising chances of seeing wildlife, including grizzly and black bears.

On sunny days, the sight of snow-capped mountains and blue skies reflecting on the surfaces of the Peyto and Waterfowl will have any keen photographer stopping every five minutes.

Best for: star-gazing and glacier walks
How long: 3 days

نتيجة بحث الصور عن ‪The Icefields Parkway, Alberta‬‏

3. Regina to Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan has the reputation for being a flat, prairie province as many drivers experience it only from the Trans-Canada Highway.

Start in Regina, where you can visit the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Heritage Centre and, on Tuesdays from July to mid-August, view Mounties on parade in the Sunset-Retreat Ceremony.

Head to Moose Jaw to learn about bootlegging during the Prohibition era, when mobsters ran booze into the USA from the small town.

نتيجة بحث الصور عن ‪saskatchewan canada‬‏

4. Vancouver to Tofino, British Columbia

This road trip starts with a ferry crossing: board the boat in Horseshoe Bay and relax for a couple of hours while crossing the Strait of Georgia to Vancouver Island.

The following 207km drive from Nanaimo to Tofino gives you an opportunity to stop in MacMillan Provincial Park and walk between the mossy trunks of enormous Douglas fir trees, some of which are up to 800 years old. The twisting course of the Pacific Rim Highway makes it a thrilling woodland drive. Kennedy Lake Provincial Park is a popular spot to break for a picnic.

Finally, unwind at Tofino, which is making a name as a surfing destination. Nearby Long Beach stretches for 16km and at Esowista you can meet members of the local First Nations community.

Best for: surfing and woodland walks
How long: 2 days

صورة ذات صلة

5. Montréal to the Gaspé Peninsula, Québec

Montréal celebrates 375 years since foundation in 2017. The signposted Chemin du Roy tourist route follows the north shore of the St Lawrence River, via heritage sites in villages such as Deschambault and Neuville, to Québec City. It’s easy to spend a couple of days exploring the old town and fortifications, including the Citadelle of Québec.

Gaspé overlooks the Gulf of St Lawrence, at the tip of the peninsula, almost 700km north-east of the provincial capital. Québec’s residents head to the area to enjoy nature and relax at fishing camps.

Whale watching trips run from Gaspé and nearby Percé, where a sheer-sided rock juts from the water. If you’re into birdwatching, take a boat to Bonaventure Island to see the vast gannet colonies and almost 300 other seabird species.

Best for: heritage sites and whale-watching
How long: 7 days

نتيجة بحث الصور عن ‪Gaspé Peninsula‬‏

 

By Stuart Forster. Source from Rough Guides.